RFTIT Tumblr Weeklyish Roundup

Hey folks! So now that Sansa III is out of the way – which officially pushes me over the one-third mark through ASOS – I’m going to take a little bit of time to do some work on some Kickstarter essays. I’ve started doing some notes on Maurice Druon’s Accursed Kings and I’ve hauled out my notes on Dunk and Egg, so I’m hoping to spend the next week writing those up.

In the mean-time, I’ve got some stuff on the Tumblrs for you:

ASOIAF:

Non-ASOIAF:

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Chapter-by-Chapter Analysis: Sansa III, ASOS

“Sansa tried to run, but Cersei’s handmaid caught her before she’d gone a yard.”

Synopsis: a pre-teen girl is forced into marriage with an enemy of her family and for some reason people think she is the bad guy.

SPOILER WARNING: This chapter analysis, and all following, will contain spoilers for all Song of Ice and Fire novels and Game of Thrones episodes. Caveat lector.

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RFTIT Tumblr Weeklyish Roundup (Part II)

Quotes have been put into the outline for Sansa III, which is going to be a rather difficult essay to write, because it requires a very delicate touch. The mountain of signature books has been successfully moved from front door to living room, so I plan to start signing them tomorrow.

In the mean-time, lots more Tumblrs:

ASOIAF:

Non-ASOIAF:

Chapter-by-Chapter Analysis: Daenerys III, ASOS

She felt desperately afraid. Was this what my brother would have done?”

Synopsis: Dany (Ocean) robs Astapor.

SPOILER WARNING: This chapter analysis, and all following, will contain spoilers for all Song of Ice and Fire novels and Game of Thrones episodes. Caveat lector.

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RFTIT Tumblr Weeklyish Roundup

Hey, folks! The books have arrived for my signatures, and it’s an intimidating pile. In the mean-time, here are some Tumblrs for your enjoyment.

ASOIAF:

Non-ASOIAF:

Vox Populi, Vox Deii: Elections in ASOIAF, Part II

Image result for the hustings goarth

Introduction

For his second foray into electioneering in AFFC, George R.R Martin clearly decided to go with a simpler model that would (among other things) require less math than the repeated ballots of the Night’s Watch, one that harkens back to the elections and democratic processes of the (early) Middle Ages.

As I talked about in Part I, the Althing of Iceland dates back to the 10th century as an example of medieval popular assemblies, but the althing was but one of a number of assemblies that existed across a wide swathe of Europe, from the British Isles (both by way of the Anglo-Saxons who brought the folkmoots over from Saxony in the 5th century, becoming the Witenaġemots of the 7th through 11th centuries, and by way of the Danes who brought the thing to Scotland, the Danelaw, and even the Isle of Man) to the veches of Novgorod.

But by whatever name they were called, these assemblies had certain features in common. First, emerging out of their initial purpose as a common venue for addressing inter- and intra-tribal feuds that would otherwise lead to blood feuds, they were judicial bodies. Second, they had the authority to “ceosan to cynige” (choose the king) and depose them, as happened to Sigeberht of Wessex and Alhred of Northumbria, for example. Third, the assemblies acted as the assembled political class who were there to advise the monarch and lend their blessings to his decrees.

And most importantly for the subject of this essay, at least in the beginning – before the rise of feudalism gave more authority to the leading thanes, earls, and ealdormen, and the coming of Christianity meant that the bishops, archbishops, and abbots joined the assemblies – they consisted of the entire free population of the hundred, province, or kingdom, who were (at least in Scandinavia) advised by the lawspeakers, the wise men who memorized and recited the previous laws decided by the things of ages past.

So how does the Kingsmoot stack up to these real-world moots?

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RFTIT Tumblr Weeklyish Roundup

Hey folks, I want to let people know that, now that Volumes I and II of Race for the Iron Throne are in print, my editor and I are working on Kickstarter fulfillment: first, we’re working on putting in orders for all the people who ordered print copies, which we’ll ship directly to their addresses; second, we’re also putting in orders for people who ordered signed copies, which will be shipped to me so I can sign them and then ship them out.

In the mean time, we’ve got some tumblrs:

ASOIAF:

Non-ASOIAF:

Chapter-by-Chapter Analysis: Jon III, ASOS

jon ygritte

“His guilt came back afterward, but weaker than before. If this was so wrong, why did the gods make it feel so good?”

Synopsis: “Oh sweet mystery of life, at last I’ve found you…”

SPOILER WARNING: This chapter analysis, and all following, will contain spoilers for all Song of Ice and Fire novels and Game of Thrones episodes. Caveat lector.

Continue reading

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