RFTIT Tumblr Weeklyish Roundup

Hey, folks! So my class got started, but what with the (edge of the) polar vortex, I’ve been feeling hibernaty and not really in the mood to write recently. I hope to rectify this in the coming week where I won’t be as cold or as busy.

In the mean-time, we’ve got some good stuff in the Tumblrs.

ASOIAF:

Non-ASOIAF:

 

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4 thoughts on “RFTIT Tumblr Weeklyish Roundup

  1. Jim B says:

    Re Magneto: are you sure he gets acquitted? My recollection is that, after the Fenris attack, he simply doesn’t return to the courtroom, having accepted Xavier’s request that he take over the school, which Xavier tells him “will serve as a far nobler monument — and better safeguard to mutantkind — than your martyrdom at this trial.” See synopsis and panels here:
    http://xmen-comics-geek.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-uncanny-x-men-issue-200-trial-of.html

    Peter Parker: for all of his endearing and admirable qualities, Peter has always been a bit of a screw-up. He’s constantly struggling to just keep up with all of the competing demands on his time, so he never really is able to plan ahead or get any kind of organization in his life. Some of which is completely understandable, of course, given all those demands on his time. But some of it seems avoidable, too. How many times did he manage to “run out of web fluid” in mid-swing before he finally invented an indicator light to remind him to switch cartridges? I haven’t kept up as much in recent years, but I recall that after regaining control of his body from Doc Ock, Peter was kind of embarrassed at how Otto really had done a better job of updating his suit and gadgets — not because Otto was any more brilliant, but just because he was organized.

    • You’re right that, the trial doesn’t end, but on p.41 the chief judge said she would accept a plea in mitigation of sentence, which is close enough for horseshoes and handgrendades.

  2. lluewhyn says:

    Good stuff on the Gared question. When reading it, I thought the impression for the reader was that it was suppose to be unfortunate, not unjust. They do a good job of explaining why the characters consider it a just sentence. It’s just unfortunate because the reader knows the man carries important information that is lost.

    I think it’s also one of the first big indicators in the series that the POV perspective is unique, and that the main characters won’t always just magically get along or see things from the same perspective*, even if the readers think they should. The second big head’s up of course in Daenerys’s chapter where you have a sympathetic character having a completely different perspective of the main protagonists.

    *Without relying upon some contrived TV Tropes Poor Communication Kills gimmicks to stir up pointless conflict, either.

  3. Jim B says:

    So I’m finishing up Blood & Fire, and seeing yet another reference (this time in the context of Queen Jaehaera’s death) to the common folk rending their garments in grief.

    It’s certainly an expression I’ve seen before outside of GRRM’s writing, but… is this a thing that ever happened in real life? Did commoners just start ripping up their clothes out of grief that the monarch (or local lord) had died?

    I’m struggling to think of an example in modern times of anyone tearing their clothes out of emotional reaction (Alex Jones theatrically ripping off his shirt to show how angry he is doesn’t count!), and it seems odd to me that people would have been more likely to do that centuries ago when the average person probably didn’t have a lot of clothes to spare. Google brings up some references, but they all appear to be related to a specific Jewish ritual of grief.

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